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Welcome to my official website. Thank you for stopping by to see what's going on in my world. Whether you've been following me since my days as a Lobo at the University of New Mexico, or have been cheering me on with the Chicago Bears, or if you're just a regular football fanatic, your support is truly appreciated.

Feel free to browse around, there's plenty of things to check out including my biography, stats, football camp information and an awesome fan shop filled with my officially licensed merchandise. Before you go, don't forget to sign up for emails, so we can stay in touch. Thank you for all your support

Brian Urlacher

When people think of the Chicago Bears, many will think of an imposing defense, heaving and looming over the line of scrimmage; the breath from their mouths steaming in the air like car exhaust pipes on Lake Shore Drive, waiting for the quarterback to yell "Hike" so they can turn loose their sprawling, aggressive force on the opposing players. This image is embodied by one of the most famous Chicago Bears of all time, Brian Urlacher. A fitting heir to the Chicago Bears long-standing tradition of dominating middle linebackers, Urlacher is today's best known and most feared Monster of the Midway. But this terrorizing force has a long story that spans the country from Washington to New Mexico, to his current home in the Windy City.

Brian Urlacher was born on May 25, 1978 in Pasco, Washington. After his parents' divorce, Brian moved with his mother, Lavoyda and siblings, Sheri and Casey to Lovington, New Mexico for a fresh start. It was in Lovington that Brian's athletic abilities were discovered. In high school, he was a stand-out athlete in both basketball and football. As a sophomore, Brian earned playing time as a wide receiver for the Wildcats. After the season, Brian was encouraged to hit the weight room by Coach Jamie Quinones. Over the next two years, he grew an amazing 5 inches and put on 60 pounds of muscle, all while maintaining his speed and agility. This growth spurt made him an unbeatable force for the upcoming football season. His senior year, he led the Wildcats to a 14-0 perfect season and the 3-A State Championship. He was also given All-State Honors for his skills as a receiver and safety. Considering his athletic abilities and the recognition he was receiving, everyone thought the college scholarship offers would come flowing in.

Brian had hoped to attend Texas Tech, however, they didn't offer him a much-needed scholarship. New Mexico State and the University of New Mexico were the only Division I schools to express serious interest in him. He chose to attend the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. In his first two years as a Lobo, he didn't get a lot of playing time as head coach Dennis Franchione's strategy focused more on upperclassmen. In 1997, Franchione left the Lobos and was replaced by Lobo alumni Rocky Long. This was a great turn of events for Brian. Coach Long helped Brian get the national recognition he deserved. Long recognized his true potential and utilized him to his full potential. He became one of the most versatile players in Lobo history, rotating between linebacker, receiver, safety and special team's returner. He finished out his college career with 422 tackles, the third most in Lobo's history.

During the 2000 NFL Draft, Brian was chosen ninth by the Chicago Bears in the first round. His rookie season started off rough. Coach Dick Jauron took Brian out of his middle linebacker position and put him on the strong-side. Although he was used to playing a variety of positions, he struggled considerably at training camp and during exhibition games. Before the official season started, Coach Jauron publicly demoted Brian and replaced him with second-year fourth rounder Rosevelt Colvin. Although disappointed, Brian didn't let this minor setback get him down. He stayed focused and when middle linebacker Barry Minter hurt his back before the NY Giants game, Brian stepped up and took over. He recorded 13 tackles, 2 for losses and 1 sack, reminding everyone, especially his coaches, why he was a number one draft pick. With that game, Brian took back his starting position and hasn't looked back since. He finished out his rookie year with an impressive 165 total tackles, 8 sacks, 103 solos and 7 tackles for losses. At the end of his rookie season, he had accumulated numerous accolades including the prestigious NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year Award. Comparisons between Brian and legendary Bears linebackers Dick Butkus and Mike Singletary were inevitable as he became known as one of the "Monsters of the Midway." He was a consistent force during his 13 years with the Bears, recording over 100 tackles in every season, except 2004 during which an injury prevented him from playing in 7 games. In 2005, Brian led his team in 121 tackles and earned the Defensive Player of the Year Award. He was named to eight Pro Bowls and was a 4-Time First Team All-Pro. Brian was also a driving force behind the Bears appearance in Super Bowl XLI. He finished his career by amassing an amazing 1353 tackles, 41.5 sacks, 22 interceptions and 5 touchdowns.

Despite his success, Brian has still managed to remain grounded. He continues to be involved with his high school in Lovington, NM, donating supplies and equipment and hosting an annual charity basketball game. He is very involved with the Special Olympics and Ronald McDonald House. In 2002, he won over $47,000 on Wheel of Fortune which he divided equally between the Special Olympics organizations in Illinois and New Mexico. He is also a devoted father to his three children, Pamela, Riley and Kennedy.

His dedication and hard work, combined with his God-given talent have made Brian one of the best linebackers in Bears history, and a fan favorite. This Monster of the Midway doesn't seem to be going anywhere besides straight towards the NFL Hall of Fame.

Defensive Stats

SEASON

TEAM

GP

COMB

TOTAL

AST

SACK

FF

FR

YDS

INT

YDS

AVG

LNG

TD

PD

STF

STFYDS

KB

2000

16

123

97

26

8.0

0

1

0

2

19

10

19

0

5

0

0

0

2001

16

116

89

27

6.0

2

2

0

3

60

20

41

0

8

3

0

0

2002

16

151

115

36

4.5

2

2

0

1

0

0

0

0

7

15

0

0

2003

16

116

87

29

2.5

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

5

0

0

2004

9

70

52

18

5.5

2

0

0

1

42

42

42

0

7

5

0

0

2005

16

121

97

24

6.0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

11

0

0

2006

16

142

93

49

0.0

1

1

0

3

38

13

36

0

9

11

22

0

2007

16

123

92

31

5.0

0

2

0

5

101

20

85

1

12

3

4

0

2008

16

93

79

14

0.0

0

1

0

2

11

6

11

0

10

10

16

0

2009

1

3

3

0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

2010

16

125

96

29

4.0

2

3

0

1

0

0

0

0

10

10

24

0

2011

16

102

84

18

0.0

0

2

29

3

7

2

8

0

7

8

15

0

2012

12

68

53

15

0.0

2

2

4

1

46

46

46

1

7

8

23

0

Career

182

1353

1037

316

41.5

12

16

0

22

324

15

85

2

91

90

105

0

Passing Stats

SEASON

TEAM

GP

CMP

ATT

CMP%

YDS

AVG

TD

LNG

INT

FUM

QBR

RAT

2002

16

0

1

0.0

0

0.00

0

0

0

0

--

39.6

Career

32

0

1

0.0

0

0.00

0

0

0

0

--

39.6

Receiving Stats

SEASON

TEAM

GP

REC

TGTS

YDS

AVG

LNG

TD

FD

FUM

LST

2001

16

1

-

27

27.0

27

1

1

0

0

Career

32

1

0

27

27.0

27

1

1

0

0

Scoring Stats

SEASON

TEAM

GP

PASS

RUSH

REC

RET

TD

2PT

PAT

FG

PTS

2001

16

0

0

1

1

2

0

0

0

12

2007

16

0

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

6

2009

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2010

16

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2011

16

0

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

6

2012

12

0

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

6

Career

77

0

0

1

4

5

0

0

0

30

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